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Slash Open Source Project

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  • Well? Wouldn't that make more sense? Using CSS instead of light mode? I mean, CSS should be "lighter" anyways right?

    How many users use light mode anyways?

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    It's either on the beat or off the beat, it's that easy.
    • Oh, for example. If I use Dreamweaver MX's CONVERT TABLES TO LAYERS, I get get a Page on my site that, according to Dreamweaver, is 117K (33 secs) to load, compared to the 125K (35 secs) to load the old page.

      I'm sure if we got rid of those sl.gif files and such, we'd be set!

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      It's either on the beat or off the beat, it's that easy.
      • I'm on a GNU/Linux system so I can not use Dreamweaver.

        Slash's 'light mode' is according to the option to enable it, about making Slash output less complex HTML for use with browsers on PDA's or text-based browsers like Lynx. Or just making pages smaller so that people with a slow connection can download pages faster / cheaper.

        CSS can absolutely be used to make pages smaller, however I'm not so sure that all possible ways of using CSS will make pages smaller.

        There are three ways of using CSS:

        1. Using the STYLE attribute on all tags where formating is needed
        2. Using the style tag inside the head tag on all pages
        3. Using a external style-sheet, that all pages use. Possible to have alternative style-sheets that the user can choose.

        I'm not that sure that the first way is going to make pages smaller. The second and third will however make the pages a lot smaller. The best way of testing this is probably with a article on a Slash Site with lots of comments.

        I'm using the third way and have a external style-sheet in my theme. A browser that doesn't support CSS don't have to load the style-sheet. A browser that does support CSS loads the external style-sheet once and can load it from the cache on all other pages that the user visits.

        Plus, the 'light mode' in Slash only includes 8 templates, my theme will hopefully make most ( if not all ) pages smaller / less complex.